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A Short History of Tay Ho

From a small village populated with adobe houses to one of the wealthiest areas in Hanoi, all in 25 years. Jesse Meadows tracks the rise of Tay Ho ...


When safe drinking water is nowhere to be found, you could always head on down to Furbrew for some hop-infused refreshment. ...

Quan Bui Garden

One of Saigon’s best known Vietnamese restaurant chains, Quan Bui is garnering a reputation. But is it deserved? Our mystery diner finds out. Photos by Rodney Hughes ...

Phong Nha Farmstay

When Ben and Bich Mitchell first opened Phong Nha Farmstay in December 2010, the local consensus was that they had a screw loose. ...

The Birdcage Village

Want to know where all those birdcages come from? Just do what Jesse Meadows did and drive out to Canh Hoach Village ...

MAD House District 7

  At MAD House in District 7, the follow-up to the successful MAD House in District 2 started by Danish couple Camilla Bailey and Casper Gustafsen, the name of the game is simplicity. What they show is minimalist, but what it tells is know-how. ...

Hanoi BBQ Olympics

Who needs the Olympics in Rio when we’ve got our very own version in Hanoi? Words by Edward Dalton. Photos by Julie Vola ...




The Freestylers will perform live at The Hi-Fi on Friday Apr. 16.

Having rocked dancefloors around the world since the glory days of electronic music back in the mid-90s, this veteran British collective are past masters at building up a heady groove. More old-school hip hop, electro and ragga than big-beat techno (though they're often pigeon-holed that way), the Freestylers were formed by the trio of Matt Cantor, Aston Harvey and Andrew Galea. All three were British b-boys back in the day, and were heavily involved in Britain's dance scene by the late 1980s, both as DJs and producers. Era defining hits included Drop the Boom, a dancefloor smash on both sides of the Atlantic in 1997, Here We Go and Don’t Stop.

The success of the latter two hits gave the guys, now minus Galea who left in 1997, a platform to break the US, and their album We Rock Hard went on to sell over 150,000 stateside. Their growing prominence brought them to the attention of some of the biggest names in hip hop and they were asked to remix tracks by legends of the genre such as Afrika Bambaataa and the Jungle Brothers. The next few years saw the boys going from strength to strength. They mixed the big beat compilation album FSUK 2 and a Radio 1 Essential Mix featuring artists as diverse as Public Enemy and The Fall.


The Hi-Fi, 2nd Floor, 69 Dong Khoi, Q1, Ho Chi Minh City


Editor's Picks

Sewers in the Sky

Bad air quality is finally getting the media coverage it deserves. So what’s the solution? 

The Salad Professor

I met 70-year-old Luu Van Hao at his small apartment on the second floor of a building situated at the end of Ngo Huyen. He had recently arrived home after a long trip visiting a friend. His wife looked fed up, partly because the business had...

The Flower Seller

Nguoi ban hoa or flower seller is a sensitive phrase in Vietnamese, as it has latterly become a slang term meaning a prostitute.


Tran Cam Thu takes a trip to the ‘happiest place on earth’ hoping to learn something about the art of being happy. Photos by Hang Le

Ostriches of the Imagination

How could we improve our traffic system? Simple, says Devin Monaghan. Replace motorbikes with ostriches

Editor's Picks

In Search of the Super Cave

Or, how Ed Weinberg went looking for Southeast Asia’s largest volcanic cave and got scraped...

Falling Off the Wagon

It’s a common New Year’s resolution — go a month or so without drinking. Jon...

A Brief History of Bia Hoi

Considered the ultimate people’s beer, bia hoi started off as a concession to the shortages...

Burger Wars

Four expert judges battled lunchtime traffic, salad cravings and meat sweats to taste 10 burgers...

The Cartoonist

A cartoonist and a teacher, But Chi’s raison d’etre is to use the creation and...

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